Meet the DTN Players

My sports romance novella, Defending the Net (DTN) is being released on 11/10/18. Today, I will be introducing the cast of DTN. Because this is a spoiler-free post, not all cast members will be introduced. The reason being is that I would be unable to effectively discuss any of them without giving away key plot points. I’ll begin the introductions with the MC and leading man, Brighton Rabalais.

Brighton Rabalais, or Bry as he is called by his closest friends, is a rookie goalie, newly recruited to the Saint Anne Civet hockey franchise. He’s a first-round draft pick with loads of talent and a humble heart. All he wants is to play hockey. His confidence is swayed, not by a lack of talent, but due to the politics behind his recruitment. It’s dirty. He’s there to undermine payment negotiations with veteran goalie, Gatien Glesseau.

Gatien Glesseau is a three-time national champion with good looks, great moves, and a bite every bit as severe as his growl. He’s able to turn on and off his emotions quicker than most blink. His goal (literally) is to be treated fairly, but he understands that’s a slim chance of happening with Brighton in the Brighton. Gatien is handsome, smart, and some years older than Brighton. However, that doesn’t mean he can’t learn things from his junior. It also means his Brighton is a real threat.

Next up is Semien Metoyér, the Civets center, and Brighton’s best friend since college. Semien is a type of enigma to the hockey stereotype with his mild-manner, clean-cut, and non-foul mouth. One might mistake him for a video gamer than a hockey player—though they’d be very wrong. Already in the national league, Semien is sure to have Brighton’s back.

Dylan is Brighton’s roommate and the antithesis of Brighton. While Brighton is quiet and humble, Dylan is boisterous and breaming with confidence to the point of arrogance. Not only is he the opposite in personality, but physically he’s much smaller—shorter, thinner, and not very strong.

Dr. Janesen is Brighton’s warmhearted, nurturing, down-to-earth physician. She tells it like it is. Although always professional, she cares deeply for Brighton as if he were a member of her family.

Christophe Fortenot is the team’s captain and might as well say, the welcoming committee. Team members follow Christophe’s lead. Therefore, having his acceptance is necessary and more important than the owners. Christophe is … well, Christophe. He has his own flare.

Finally, Nicco Bale is another veteran player. On the ice, Nicco adds power and muscle to the team. Off the ice, he’s a bit of a busybody and instigator. However, he means no harm, and characters tend to laugh when he around … sometimes. Nicco doesn’t take himself seriously, and that works for him. But he’s more complex than he seems.

And that’s it for the cast. Read about them all in DTN.

Don’t forget to visit Creole Bayou again. New posts are made on Wednesdays. If you have any questions or suggestions about this post or any others, feel free to comment below or tweet me at @dolynesaidso. You also can follow me on Instagram at genevivechambleeauthor or search me on Goodreads or Amazon Authors.

Enjoy sports romance? Check out my new adult romance, Defending the Net, being released in November. It is the second in my hockey series and guaranteed to melt the ice. Preorder at: https://books2read.com/defending. Crossing the line could cost the game.

Missed the first in my hockey romance series? Don’t worry. Out of the Penalty Box, an adult romance where it’s one minute in the box or a lifetime out is available at http://amzn.to/2Bhnngw. It also can be ordered on iTunes, Nook, or Kobo. For more links where to purchase or to read the blurb, please visit http://bit.ly/2i9SqpH.

Life’s Roux: Wrong Doors, my steamy romantic comedy, is available at Red Sage Publishing. To order, follow the link to Amazon at http://amzn.to/2lCQXpt.

Copies of all my books and stories are available in paper, eBook, and audio on Amazon, iTunes, Kobo, and Barnes & Noble. The links are listed in my Writing Projects page (http://bit.ly/2iDYRxU) along with descriptions of each of my novels or stories.

NEWSLETTER! Want to get the latest information and updates about my writing projects, giveaways, contests, and reveals first? Click on Newsletter and signup today.

If you enjoy reading this blog, please share it with your friends and family. There’s never too many people in the bayou. Spread the word.

 

An Interview with Myself

Over the months, I’ve been asked many questions about Defending the Net (DTN) and my writing process. I found that several are the same questions. I guess inquiring minds do want to know. Therefore, today’s post will attempt to answer the most common questions I’m asked about DTN.

What was the inspiration that causes me to want to write DTN? The answer is twofold—or maybe threefold. First, I love writing, and I love hockey. It only seemed natural that I would pair my two loves. Second, after the release of Out of the Penalty Box (OotPB), people asked if there would be a sequel or more. At the time, I hadn’t given it much thought and was unsure. But as time went on, I was intrigued by the challenge of writing a series, which I’ve never done. Third, there are more stories for me to tell about this hockey team. Lastly, but certainly not least, I didn’t want to disappoint readers. As long as readers want to read my stories, I’m more than happy to write them. My goal is to entertain.

What was the most difficult part in writing DTN? As with any novel, the story needs to be fresh. Because some of the characters from OotPB are also in DTN, I wanted to ensure there wasn’t too much overlay/overlap and the focus remains on the current characters and story.

What is the audience for DTN? Is it erotica? Well, the steam factor is high, and readers definitely should use plenty of sunscreen. But no, DTN is not erotica. It’s a new adult/adult romance. And here’s why it’s not erotica. The story between Bright and Gatien is first and foremost a love story. Everything else that happens is secondary to their romantic relationship.

Will there be more books in this series? Possibly.

How long did DTN take to write? This is a complicated question because I had the basic idea and concept long before I began writing. Once I started, I had to set it aside to fulfill other obligations. However, overall, the writing was quick. But getting the first draft completed is far from the end. Editing took a bit and then getting it to production took longer.

Am I as excited for DTN as I was for OotPB? Oh, heck yeah! Both were fun to write and challenging in different ways. It’s like a parent with multiple children—you’re thrilled for each one.

What have I learned from writing DTN? There are so many lessons, but I think my biggest lesson isn’t writing-related but sports-related. I’m a huge hockey fan, and over the years, hockey has changed and evolved. The one thing I’d never thought much about was the process and thought that goes into designing a goalie’s mask. It was eye-opening to learn about this.

Enjoy sports romance? Check out my new adult romance, Defending the Net, being released in November. It is the second in my hockey series and guaranteed to melt the ice. Preorder at: https://books2read.com/defending. Crossing the line could cost the game.

Missed the first in my hockey romance series? Don’t worry. Out of the Penalty Box, an adult romance where it’s one minute in the box or a lifetime out is available at http://amzn.to/2Bhnngw. It also can be ordered on iTunes, Nook, or Kobo. For more links where to purchase or to read the blurb, please visit http://bit.ly/2i9SqpH.

Life’s Roux: Wrong Doors, my steamy romantic comedy, is available at Red Sage Publishing. To order, follow the link to Amazon at http://amzn.to/2lCQXpt.

Copies of all my books and stories are available in paper, eBook, and audio on Amazon, iTunes, Kobo, and Barnes & Noble. The links are listed in my Writing Projects page (http://bit.ly/2iDYRxU) along with descriptions of each of my novels or stories.

NEWSLETTER! Want to get the latest information and updates about my writing projects, giveaways, contests, and reveals first? Click on Newsletter and signup today.

If you enjoy reading this blog, please share it with your friends and family. There’s never too many people in the bayou. Spread the word.

The Quick & Dirty Guide to Hockey

This month, I’m celebrating my soon-to-be-released, romance novella, Defending the Net (DTN). DTN follows two steaming hawt goalies, Brighton and Gatien, of the Saint Anne Civets. Set in Louisiana, these two players melt the ice. DTN is the second in my sports romance series. The first, Out of the Penalty Box (OotPB), was released earlier this year. Although it’s not necessary to know all the ins-and-outs of hockey to enjoy these stories, I thought I’d write a post on a few hockey basics.

The goal of hockey (see what I did there?) is to score goals by using a stick to hit a three-inch puck across a rink of ice (200 feet long by 85 feet wide) into a net (4 feet tall by 6 feet wide). Simple enough, until you add brawny players that get in the way.

The regular game is divided into three twenty-minute periods and two seventeen intermissions. (As a side note, the intermissions were increased from fifteen minutes to seventeen minutes in 2013. Players will tell you this two-minute increase, while may not seem like much, is much appreciated by players.) If after three periods teams are tied, the game goes into overtime or possibly a shootout. A shootout occurs if the game remains tied in overtime and consists of a set number of players shooting goals one-on-one against the goalie.

Hockey teams consist of a maximum of twenty dressed players per game but may have twenty-three players on the active roster. The twenty players are divided into twelve forwards, six defensive men, and two goalies. The forwards consist of left wings, right wings, and centers. The goalies are a starting goalie and a backup goalie. During a game, each team has six players on the ice. Generally, this is three forwards (left wing, right wing, and center) who are called linesmen, a pair of defensive me who are called partners, and a goalie. Sometimes, if a team is behind, in the final minutes of the game, the coach will take out the goalie and replace with an additional forward. This group of forwards and defensive players forms what is known as a line. Typically, each team has four lines that play in shifts. Substitutions of players and line changes happen “on the fly”. This means play does not stop when a player leaves the ice and a new player from the bench takes his play. In hockey, play is continuous unless a penalty is called, a timeout is called, a player is seriously injured (key word is “seriously”), the goalie smothers the puck, the puck is shot over the glass, or a goal is scored. (BTW, the “glass” is not actually glass. It used to be back in the day, but glass shatters and not only is that expensive and dangerous, it slows down the game when it needs to be replaced. Hockey’s all about speed. However, the term glass has hung around.)

Hockey rules can be complicated to understand. There are several types of penalties, but each fall into one of six categories: minor, double minor, major, match penalty, misconduct, and game misconduct.

  • A minor penalty gets a player two minutes in the penalty box plus a power play (PP) for the opposing team. (A PP is when one team has more players on the ice due to the other team having a player(s) serving penalty time.)
  • As suggested, a double minor results in four minutes in the box and a PP.
  • A major penalty has no reduction in power, but the offending player must remain in the penalty box for five minutes regardless of scoring.
  • Match penalty and game misconduct are similar. Both involve removing of a player from the remainder of the game. A match penalty removes a player from the balance of the game and ten minutes in the box. A player cannot participate in any hockey-related activities until his case is heard by the proper sporting authorities.
  • Game misconduct penalties usually end in fines and/or suspensions.
  • A misconduct penalty yields ten minutes in the box with immediate substitution on the ice. If a second misconduct is given during the same game, it becomes a game misconduct.

The game is officiated by two referees and two line judges. The referees have much discretion in how a penalty is called/assessed. And when players feel the refs have missed something they feel should have been called, they usually take care of it themselves and “throw down the mitts”. Fighting is a staple in hockey; although, the league has tried to impose rules to limit it. And when a brawl does break out, don’t be surprised if the officials don’t rush to break it up. Sometimes, it’s best to just allow the players to get it out of their system. Besides, how eager would you be to step between two mountains of muscles standing on razor-sharp blades?

So, there you have it, enough to get through a game without being completely lost as to what is happening.

Be sure to order a copy of Defending the Net. It is available in multiple forms including Amazon, iTunes, Nook, or Kobo are my other books at https://books2read.com/defending.

Don’t forget to visit Creole Bayou again. New posts are made on Wednesdays. If you have any questions or suggestions about this post or any others, feel free to comment below or tweet me at @dolynesaidso. You also can follow me on Instagram at genevivechambleeauthor or search me on Goodreads or Amazon Authors.

Out of the Penalty Box, an adult sports romance and the first novella in my hockey series is available for purchase at http://amzn.to/2Bhnngw. It also can be ordered on iTunes, Nook, or Kobo. For more links where to purchase or to read the blurb, please visit http://bit.ly/2i9SqpH.

Life’s Roux: Wrong Doors, my steamy romantic comedy, is available at Red Sage Publishing. To order, follow the link to Amazon at http://amzn.to/2lCQXpt.

Copies of all my books and stories are available in paper, eBook, and audio on Amazon, iTunes, Kobo, and Barnes & Noble. The links are listed in my Writing Projects page (http://bit.ly/2iDYRxU) along with descriptions of each of my novels or stories.

NEWSLETTER! Want to get the latest information and updates about my writing projects, giveaways, contests, and reveals first? Click on Newsletter and signup today.

Ahhh…French Onion Soup

Sometimes, one just wants comfort food. There’s no better comfort food, especially on a cold day than a bowl of hot homemade soup. French onion soup is like curling up with an old friend. Add some candles, and this can be extremely romantic. It’s also one of those meals that won’t break the bank. It’s simple enough that it doesn’t require a lot of time. It can be made in advance and stored in a freezer for later. It can feed large quantities of people. It’s hardy enough to stick to one’s ribs so one isn’t hungry an hour later. Literally, there are so many positives about this food, that I can’t list them all. For all the reasons mentioned previously and so many more, this is the reason this food has remained a staple in New Orleans and across Louisiana. Dive in and enjoy.

Ingredients:

  • ½ cup unsalted water
  • 2 tbs olive oil
  • 4 cups sliced onions
  • 4 (10.5 oz/ cans beef broth
  • ½ cup red wine
  • ½ cup white wine
  • 2 tsp sherry
  • 1 tsp thyme
  • 1 tsp kosher salt
  • ½ tsp black pepper
  • French bread
  • 4 slices Provolone cheese
  • 2 slices Swiss cheese
  • ¼ cup grated Parmesan cheese
  • 2 cloves garlic (minced)
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 2 tbs all-purpose flour
  • ½ grated Gruyere

Instructions:

  1. 8-quart pot medium heat
  2. Melt butter with olive oil
  3. Add garlic, onions, bay leaves, and cook until tender
  4. Add beef broth, sherry, and thyme
  5. Sint
  6. Add salt and pepper
  7. Cook 30 minutes
  8. Serve in bowls
  9. Cut bread into cubes and place on top

Don’t forget to visit Creole Bayou again. New posts are made on Wednesdays. If you have any questions or suggestions about this post or any others, feel free to comment below or tweet me at @dolynesaidso. You also can follow me on Instagram at genevivechambleeauthor or search me on Goodreads or Amazon Authors.

Enjoy sports romance? Check out my new adult romance, Defending the Net, being released in November. Preorder at: https://books2read.com/defending. It is the second in my hockey series and guaranteed to melt the ice. Preordering information coming soon. Crossing the line could cost the game. JOIN ME on NOVEMBER 18 for the COVER REVEAL.

Missed the first in my hockey romance series? Don’t worry. Out of the Penalty Box, an adult romance where it’s one minute in the box or a lifetime out is available at http://amzn.to/2Bhnngw. It also can be ordered on iTunes, Nook, or Kobo. For more links where to purchase or to read the blurb, please visit http://bit.ly/2i9SqpH.

Life’s Roux: Wrong Doors, my steamy romantic comedy, is available at Red Sage Publishing. To order, follow the link to Amazon at http://amzn.to/2lCQXpt.

Copies of all my books and stories are available in paper, eBook, and audio on Amazon, iTunes, Kobo, and Barnes & Noble. The links are listed in my Writing Projects page (http://bit.ly/2iDYRxU) along with descriptions of each of my novels or stories.

NEWSLETTER! Want to get the latest information and updates about my writing projects, giveaways, contests, and reveals first? Click on http://bit.ly/2zJjUdb and signup today.

If you enjoy reading this blog, please share it with your friends and family. There’s never too many people in the bayou. Spread the word.

Louisiana Trivia Facts

Louisiana always has been a magical place with many myths and intriguing facts around it. Today, I’m listing some facts about the state that may be obscure and good questions for trivia.

  1. In 1682, Robert Cavelier de La Salle claimed the Louisiana Territory. He named it “La Louisiane” after King Louis XIV. “La Louisiane” means “Land of Louis”.
  2. In 1803, the U.S. purchased the Louisiana Territory from France for fifteen million dollars.
  3. Thirteen states eventually developed out of the Louisiana Purchase.
  4. The Louisiana Territory extended from the Gulf of Mexico to the Canadian border and from the Mississippi River to the Rocky Mountains.
  5. The Louisiana purchased doubled the size of the U.S.
  6. The Battle of New Orleans occurred two weeks after the War of 1812 had ended. (Guess they really could have used Twitter back then.)
  7. The Brown Pelican is the Louisiana state bird.
  8. The Black Bear is the Louisiana state bear.
  9. The Catahoula Leopard dog is the Louisiana state dog.
  10. Milk is the official state drink. (Yeah, I know, right?)
  11. Louisiana has 64 parishes.
  12. Baton Rouge, which means “red stick” is the capital of Louisiana.
  13. Baton Rouge got its name in 1699 from Pierre Le Moyne d’Iberville, the French explorer, who claimed to have seen a pole covered in animal blood. The pole was placed along the Mississippi bluff and served as a land marker to indicate the line between the Houmas and Bayougoula Indian tribes.
  14. Saint Francisville is the second oldest time in Louisiana.
  15. The highest point in Louisiana is Driskill Mountain and is 535 feet above sea level.
  16. The lowest point in Louisiana is the city of New Orleans at 8 feet below sea level.
  17. New Orleans is the second lowest point in the U.S.
  18. Louisiana has the longest coastline (15,000 miles) of any other state in the U.S.
  19. Louisiana makes up approximately 41% of the wetlands in the U.S.
  20. The Manchaca Swamp Bridge in Ponchatoula, Louisiana, is the second longest bridge over water in the world with a total length of 120,400 feet. The swamp is rumored to be haunted.
  21. The Lake Pontchartrain Causeway at 23.83 miles in Metairie is the longest continuous bridge over water in the world.
  22. The largest freshwater river basin, the Atchafalaya Basin, is located in Saint Martin Parish.
  23. Jean Lafitte, Louisiana, was a hideaway for pirates.
  24. The Saint Charles streetcar in New Orleans is the oldest continuously operating streetcar in the world.
  25. Louisiana has the tallest state building (stand at 450 feet) in the U.S.
  26. Bonnie Parker and Clyde Barrow were ambushed and killed (Bonnie struck 53 times and Clyde struck 51 times) by Louisiana and Texas state police near Bienville Parish, Louisiana. The Bonnie and Clyde Ambush Museum in Gibsland, Louisiana, is located a few miles away from their death site.
  27. Louisiana had the first charity hospital in the U.S.
  28. In 1977, Luisa Harris, the only woman in U.S. history to officially be drafted into the National Basketball Association (NBA), was drafted by the New Orleans Jazz basketball team.
  29. On May 22, 1796, Sylvain composed by André Ernest Modeste Grétry and held at the Théatre de la Rue St. Pierre in New Orleans was the first opera to be held in the U.S.
  30. Who can beat Louisiana in gumbo? In 2010, the world’s record for the largest pot of gumbo was set by award-winning chef, John David Folse. The pot served 10,000 people. It contained 50 pounds of white crab meat, 85 pounds of oysters, 100 pounds of crab claws, 200 pounds of alligator meat, 450 pounds of catfish, and 750 pounds of shrimp.
  31. Tabasco Original Red Pepper Sauce was created in 1868 in Avery Island, Louisiana by Edmund McIlhenny who was a banker.
  32. “Laissez les bon temps rouler” is not grammatically correct. But that’s how it’s said; so, get over it grammar snobs.

Don’t forget to visit Creole Bayou again. New posts are made on Wednesdays. If you have any questions or suggestions about this post or any others, feel free to comment below or tweet me at @dolynesaidso. You also can follow me on Instagram at genevivechambleeauthor or search me on Goodreads or Amazon Authors.

Enjoy sports romance? Check out my new adult romance, Defending the Net, being released in November. It is the second in my hockey series and guaranteed to melt the ice. Preordering information coming soon. Crossing the line could cost the game. Join me for my COVER REVEAL on November 18.

Missed the first in my hockey romance series? Don’t worry. Out of the Penalty Box, an adult romance where it’s one minute in the box or a lifetime out is available at http://amzn.to/2Bhnngw. It also can be ordered on iTunes, Nook, or Kobo. For more links where to purchase or to read the blurb, please visit http://bit.ly/2i9SqpH.

Life’s Roux: Wrong Doors, my steamy romantic comedy, is available at Red Sage Publishing. To order, follow the link to http://bit.ly/2CtE7Ez or to Amazon at http://amzn.to/2lCQXpt.

Copies of all my books and stories are available in paper, eBook, and audio on Amazon, iTunes, Kobo, and Barnes & Noble. The links are listed in my Writing Projects page (http://bit.ly/2iDYRxU) along with descriptions of each of my novels or stories.

NEWSLETTER! Want to get the latest information and updates about my writing projects, giveaways, contests, and reveals first? Click on http://bit.ly/2zJjUdb and signup today.

If you enjoy reading this blog, please share it with your friends and family. There’s never too many people in the bayou. Spread the word.

Movie Review: House Divided

Writing a movie review is a little different for me, especially a movie eight years old. But there is a reason. Some time ago, readers asked for a discussion on racial passing and how that related to the Creole culture. Being such a broad and sensitive topic, I delayed writing about it for months in order to properly do research and write an objective and accurate article. Then, I read an article mentioning Betty Boop, no less, that made me feel compelled to write the post. One article led to a follow-up article. It seemed a topic difficult to get away from.

After writing Why Betty Boop Caused Trouble and One Drop Rule, I thought I was done with the subject—at least for a while. Well, that’s what I get for thinking. Nope. Once again, in the Creole community, the subject of racial passing was brought to the surface–this time due to areas of location. While a great many Creoles in the U.S. reside in Louisiana, it’s ludicrous to think that is the only area with a Creole culture presence. Creoles are not bound to the land like midcentury serfs and communities and families can be found across the nation and the world. And the argument was presented that the reason people do not know of Creole communities outside of Louisiana is that they moved from the area to pass for white. Of course, this led to a much-heated debate and name calling. Some claimed that never happened while others claimed that’s all that happened. More likely, it was probably a mixture.

It’s easy to understand the draw of both sides. In what some called the “Great Migration” after WWII, many Creole relocated from Louisiana to the west to work in oil refineries. Some of the persons who relocated probably did pass for white, either intentionally or accidentally. As generations passed, some may be unaware of their cultural history. Some claim it was because Creole were ashamed of their African blood and wanted to distance themselves. And that’s how I’ve come to writing a movie review.

Shortly after stumbling across this social media debate, I was flipping through the tube and ran across the movie, A House Divided released in 2010. I had no idea what it was about when I paused from my channel surfing. For those who do not know, A House Divided is based on the book Woman of Color, Daughter of Privilege written by Kent Anderson Leslie and published by the University of Georgia Press in 1995. It is the story of Amanda America Dickson (1849-1893), a Georgia woman with a Caucasian father who owned a large plantation in Georgia and mother who was an African slave.

The movie portrayed Amanda’s father as having a forced himself on her mother. When Amanda was born fair skinned, her biological grandmother was in awe. Amanda’s mother witnessed the response and rejected Amanda by refusing to hold or nurse her. Amanda was raised under the pretense that her biological mother had died in childbirth and was Caucasian. Legally, Amanda was a slave. However, she was never treated as such. It wasn’t until she became an adult and wanted to marry a Confederate soldier that she was informed of the truth.

When the soldier asked her father for her hand in marriage, Amanda’s father did not give his consent. She demanded to know why and was told at that. She went into denial and eloped despite her parents and grandmother’s warning. Some time later, her husband learned of her heritage and beat her. The marriage ended. (Or at least, this is what the movie led the audience to believe. It really glossed over whether the marriage was declared illegal or if there was a divorce or if they remained married and pretended they weren’t. The book may have covered this in better detail.) Whatever the case, Amanda ended up living in Maryland. Despite searching for her, her father was unable to locate her.

Now, this didn’t exactly make sense to me because it was stated that for eleven years her father financially supported her by sending money to a bank. If he knew the bank to send the money, it only makes sense he would know her whereabouts. But according to the movie, he did not. Amanda did not return to Georgia until after her father’s death. In the will, he left her 15,000 acres of land, making her the richest woman of color at that time.

Her uncle, who had failed in most of his business excursions, contested the will. Although he knew his brother was of sound mind when he made the will, he was outraged of being left out and that the inheritance had gone to a woman of color. Many arguments were presented, but it boiled down to race. The jury sided with Amanda, as well as a court of appeal.

Although Amanda was not Creole, her story does depict one that would affect a Creole person with African ancestry. Although Amanda physically looked Caucasian and was raised to think of that being her race, she was not accepted by the white community. There was a lot of hate directed towards her as well as the lawyer who represented her. When considering what she faced, it’s understandable why a person who is able to pass is willing to pass. At one point in the movie, Amanda states that she is tired of being “humiliated” and is willing to relinquish her claim. It is her mother who encourages her to fight for what is legally hers.

Amanda’s story took place in the 1800’s, yet in 2018, many of the same issues are being faced. For the readers who reached out to me after my previous two posts addressing the issue and stated that they did not understand the implications of racial passing, this is a movie to watch. It’s a little slow at the end and vague in places with large time gaps. There is no conclusion at the end that discusses what happened after the appeal case was settled, nor did the movie make clear that the legal battle took two years to be resolved. In lots of ways, the movie was anticlimactic in scenes, but that may have been 2010 standards. I wouldn’t pay to rent this movie, but if you can find it for free, it’s not a bad way to spend an hour and forty-five minutes.

Don’t forget to visit Creole Bayou again. New posts are made on Wednesdays. If you have any questions or suggestions about this post or any others, feel free to comment below or tweet me at @dolynesaidso. You also can follow me on Instagram at genevivechambleeauthor or search me on Goodreads or Amazon Authors.

 

Enjoy sports romance? Check out my new adult romance, Defending the Net, being released in November. It is the second in my hockey series and guaranteed to melt the ice. Preordering information coming soon. Crossing the line could cost the game.

Missed the first in my hockey romance series? Don’t worry. Out of the Penalty Box, an adult romance where it’s one minute in the box or a lifetime out is available at http://amzn.to/2Bhnngw. It also can be ordered on iTunes, Nook, or Kobo. For more links where to purchase or to read the blurb, please visit http://bit.ly/2i9SqpH.

Life’s Roux: Wrong Doors, my steamy romantic comedy, is available at Red Sage Publishing. To order, follow the link to http://bit.ly/2CtE7Ez or to Amazon at http://amzn.to/2lCQXpt.

Copies of all my books and stories are available in paper, eBook, and audio on Amazon, iTunes, Kobo, and Barnes & Noble. The links are listed in my Writing Projects page (http://bit.ly/2iDYRxU) along with descriptions of each of my novels or stories.

NEWSLETTER! Want to get the latest information and updates about my writing projects, giveaways, contests, and reveals first? Click on http://bit.ly/2zJjUdb and signup today.

If you enjoy reading this blog, please share it with your friends and family. There’s never too many people in the bayou. Spread the word.

First British Queen of African Descent

On 05/19/2018, millions tuned in to watch Prince Henry Charles Albert David Mountbatten-Windsor, better known as Prince Harry, the younger son of Prince Charles and Princess Diana of Wales and grandson of Queen Elizabeth II, marry Rachel Meghan Markle of Canoga Park, Los Angeles, California. Upon his marriage, Henry was bestowed the titles of Duke of Sussex, Earl of Dumbarton and Baron Kilkeel.

Meghan, now titles the Duchess of Sussex, Kensington Palace is the first person ever to hold the title of Her Royal Highness the Duchess of Sussex because the previous duke’s two marriages were both unapproved by the monarchy. This deemed them unlawful and caused his brides to be ineligible to hold the title. However, Meghan is not the first European royal of African descent, which is why some viewers that demonstrated no previous interesting the royal family tuned in to watch the wedding. Meghan describes her heritage as her father being Caucasian and her mother African American.

The first European queen of African descent was named Sophia Charlotte of Mecklenburg-Strelitz (05/19/1744 – 11/17/1818), the wife of King George III, who she married in 1761. Together, they had fifteen children. Of her children, two became kings: King George IV and King William IV. of Additionally, she was the grandmother of Queen Victoria.

Charlotte was the daughter of Duke Charles Louis Frederick of Mecklenburg and Princess Elisabeth Albertine of Saxe-Hildburghausen. She was given the titles of Queen of Great Britain, Queen of Ireland, Queen Consort of Hanover.

It is believed that although Charlotte was German, her ancestry is an African branch of the Portuguese royal family, related to Alfonso III, a thirteenth-century ruler, and his moor/African lover, Valdes. Of course, there are critics that state the evidence to support her African ancestry is thin and even if true, she is too far removed to be considered biracial.

As a side note, the city of Charlotte, North Caroline, nicknamed the Queen’s City, is named after her, and tributes to her can be found throughout the city, including statues and streets bearing her name.

Don’t forget to visit Creole Bayou again. New posts are made on Wednesdays. If you have any questions or suggestions about this post or any others, feel free to comment below or tweet me at @dolynesaidso. You also can follow me on Instagram at genevivechambleeauthor or search me on Goodreads or Amazon Authors.

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